Tag Archive | antique plater

Collection or Obsession

Of my multitudinous passions, one reigns close to the top of the list. It is a simple passion. One may say I have been bit by the bug.

 The design world is full of avid collectors. Each designer will have their own penchant for this or that. However, nearly everyone will agree, the one that is most arresting is the passion for Blue and White. I dare say, more design books have been written about this color than any other.

I see this focus of passion as a practical and intelligent design choice. Every designer worth their salt will tell you that a successful design scheme takes strict discipline.

One must start with an inspiration. My inspiration early on was blue.

Growing up with designers and then later on working in the design industry I have been exposed to various and unique design looks, beautiful rooms, and their contents. There is a new fabric, light, chair, and color every second. One must stay focused so as not to get lost and end up with a room that looks like a hodge podge with no rhythm, rhyme or reason.

The color blue is in every room of my home. It is not the only color but it is the dominant color. It is the thread that ties it all harmoniously together as one.

I once thought that blue bit me while I was in college, but, if i am honest, it happened in early childhood. My mother had a beautiful set of Liberty Blue Staffordshire plates.

The historic buildings and scenes featured would inspire my imagination of colonial times in America. Dinner was more interesting when we used the Liberty Blue. As one was having dinner, one could easily imagine the days of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. Talk about having a dinner date with history!

Later on in college, setting up my first apartment, I came across some delightful plates with a cobalt willow pattern. The plates did not have bowls, so I went to Pier One and purchased some inexpensive blue and white Chinese bowls. From that moment on I cultivated the obsession. I learned early on that cobalt blue patterned plates could be mixed and matched. It was more interesting. Each find reminds me of a different time and my life. A diary in blue and white china.

After my college years, I started adding accent colors and other accessories. I could change the mood of the table with a change of the shape, subject and accessories. I could add a pop of sunflower yellow to send an Indian inspired paisley patterned plate to Tuscany for breakfast. My blue willow could be used for a luncheon with tea or as a plate for an Asian inspired dinner. With a change of table linens the plates became a sort of chameleon.

The key is the color. Not only the blue, every blue in the cobalt violet blue family from watercolor to deep cobalt works well together. Blues that tend toward the teal or green will not do.

I also make sure that the white is the traditional stoneware. Too ivory or too white will throw off the pairings.

With focus and continuity in my color scheme, I am free to play with the mood of my table.


Here are some guidelines to get you started.

  • Choose a pattern and color you love. Shop off the beaten path.
  • Be faithful to the color. Until the shade is burned into your mind’s eye, carry a fabric swatch or paint chip that matches the color. This way you will always have a reference with you while you are out and about. Some of my best finds were stumbled upon.
  • Continuity. If you already have your home decorated use that as your inspiration. Choose your color from one already dominate in your home.
  • Bear in mind your style. Is it traditional, transitional, contemporary. Do you have a”look”, English, French, Italian.? Are you into clean modern lines or a more softer more feminine style? There are so many different looks today. If you are unsure, check out a few different design magazines. Go through and tag every picture that moves you. Then go back and compare them. This should help find your design look.
  • Accessorize. Layer with pops of colors or interesting objects of the same color. Table linens are a great way to dress the table as are flowers of any variety. Although, I recommend staying away from flowers that have a strong scent.
  • Discipline. Stick to your design scheme. This will save you time and money.

Finally, I would like to recommend one of my favorite books on this subject, A Passion for Blue and White, written by Carolyn Roehm

 


Advertisements

Regale Reasonably

One of my absolute favorite activities is to host an intimate dinner party for four to six friends. Entertaining friends in one’s home is relaxing, fun, and a great way to socialize if you are on a budget. I learned very early on that I am able to feed four or more people depending on the dish for the price it would be for one or two people dinning in a restaurant. Perhaps even less if your guests bring the wine.

Start with a tried and true recipe. It need not be haute cuisine. Choose something that you enjoy making. The company and conversation at the table is what is most important.

When I was learning to first cook, the first recipes I wanted to attempt were my grandmothers. A true chef in her own right I would follow her recipe to the letter. Never did the dish taste as delicious as when my grandmother created it. How nettlesome, and what was I doing wrong?

It was simple, aside from being a new cook, I had yet to find the fun and passion of the preparation. My focus was on the destination, the end result and not the pleasure of the journey. The knowledge that I am cooking a dish that will connect me with my grandmother, as well as share such a favorite with my friends was forgotten in the nerves and exceptions I had set for myself.

As soon as I adopted the mantra, “I can always order pizza, I can always order pizza” as well as the encouraging words of my grandmother that she too has had mishaps with meals. I began to relax, have fun, and the food began to taste better and better.

Then one day after numerous dinner parties my cookery came close to tasting like my grandmother’s, but not exactly and I realized that I would never cook exactly the same as Grandmother. She was a different person, her pinch and my pinch could never be the same, and her experiences with food in life have been different then mine. Her perspective and pallet were slightly different. After all, I love sushi and my grandmother does not. My cooking became just that – mine.

My confidence grew and I felt the freedom of experimenting and trying new cuisine. I am still no where near as an accomplished cook as my grandmother but I have confidence and a true passion for food.

Next choose plates you would like to use. I believe strongly one eats with ones eyes first. Actually studies have confirmed this. Think of the table as the stage on which you set the mood for your dinner party.

The price and where one purchases plates is inconsequential. What is important is that they bring joy to one when looked upon. This basis holds true for the cutlery, glasses, table linens and accessories.

Since this is an informal dinner party, I will only need place settings for dinner and dessert. I like for my plates to have continuity throughout an evening, so I will stay with my favorite colour blue for the two courses.

I have decided to use my whimsical maritime plates. The color and the theme set the tone going forward.

Following the plates choose the glassware. I will be serving wine with dinner, and, of course, one must always have a water glass.

In keeping with the theme, and the casual easy ambiance I would like to achieve, I will use my cheap, cheerful, and hand blown glasses. The bubbles remind me of old glass lobster buoys.

The only cutlery needed is plased standardly, napkin and fork on the left, knife, blade iron the right. I could place the desert spoon at the top, just above the plate but I will bring them out with the dessert at the end of the meal instead.

The plates have touches of green. Thus, I pull the green color as an accent and use a green majolica pitcher for the wine, and some green and blue cloth napkins.

I love to decant wine. No one is ever concerned with the label when wine is poured from a lovely pitcher or decanter.

Then the fun bit, setting and accessorizing the table! Candles are a must! Everyone and everything looks better in candle light. I adore mixing and maching tapers and votives.

Have fun using your imagination to add accessories. Simple blue glass sea shells catch the light and bring another layer to the table scape. All set upon a blue table cloth.

I want to share with you one of my own recently and favorite recipes:Kale and carrots, sauce panwith lidKale, ripped up into bite side peaces, no stem, one big handful per person. It cooks down much like spinach

Carrots, chopped into disks, one good handful per person

Garlic, minced approx two teaspoons

Butter, tablespoon per handful or to taste

Lavender, teaspoon

Sea salt, a couple good pinches

Thyme, teaspoon

Lemon, teaspoon

Water to cover the bottom of sauce pan

Toss together cover, and cook down over low heat. You may also cook down like a spinach or other greens nice and wilted.

While the Kale and Carrots cooks, sauté the fish.

Simple provincial style fillets (as easy as chicken) Skillet

8 wild snapper fillets (bones removed)

Flour, enough to lightly dust fish

Butter, two sticks

Olive oil, a good swirl in the pan. Olive oil cooks at a higher temp and will help the butter not burn.

Herbs de provence, to taste

Garlic, at least three Hefty teaspoons. Minced

Lemon, half of a small lemon, to taste.

In a large skillet on med high, heat olive oil, butter, garlic and herbs. As soon as the butter has stopped frothing add the lightly flowered fillets. Let them cook until there is a light gold color and the edges have turned opaque white. Then flip over and cook the other side being sure to baste with the butter and herbs. I like to do this often. It will keep the fish moist. This does not take very long a few minutes each side.

All served on a plate along with some good quality crusty french bread.

A nice glass of white wine and some lovely company.


Burns night

Today is one of my favorite days of the year! The birthday of the great Scots national bard Robert Burns.

Born on January 25, 1759, Robbert Burns or Robbie Burns as he is affectionately known, was an amazing poet and crusader for social reform. He was against any political or religious organization that condoned inhumanity.

Many people in the U.S. may not know his name but they know at least one of his poems. “Auld Lang Syne” sung at midnight every New Years.

One of the wonderful traditions around the world is to celebrate Burns Night. This dinner may be formal or informal depending on the Scots who are hosting. One year I was lucky enough to invite a friend who happened to also be a Military Piper. How is that for a host gift?

The other great thing about a Burns night is, you may host one anytime of year, although traditionally it is held on Robbie Burns Birthday.

Aside from pipers Burns night traditionally have a toast to the haggis in which the poem “Address to the Haggis” is recited as the Haggis is brought out on a silver tray. “Fair fa’ your honest, sonsie face, Great chiefftain of the puddin’ race!”

Then of course there is the reciting of another delightful poem “Scotch Drink”

“Let other poets raise a fracas

‘Bout vines an’ wines, an’ drunken Bacchus,…”

Robert Burns wrote many other poems of love and beauty as well. One of my all time favorite poems was written by Burns “My Heart’s in the Highlands”

Many cities world-wide will have a Burns suppers hosted by Burns Clubs, Freemasons and expats as well as some consulates.

Every Burns night I have had the pleasure to attend has been joyously fun.

Happy Burns Night Everyone!



My Blissful Habitude

 

After my Jack Russell alarm clock wakes me for my early morning walk,  I begin my morning with a simple ritual. A ritual done the world over by millions of people.

The women of my family have been performing this sacred ritual for multiple generations.  I dare say at the very least five generations, but I suspect more.

The ritual is centered around an elixir capable of sustaining the women of my family through an entire day, if need be, and made more powerful if accompanied by buttered carbs of some sort.  Most often in the form of toast.  Not just any toast, but I will return to the vehicle for butter and preserves later.

The elixir, my morning fixer, is of course Tea.  For me, it is the most perfect drink. Hot or cold. However,  I prefer hot.

I once had to go a month without a drop. Know that I do not exaggerate when I say if the dogs did not require my assistance in the morning I would have wished to stay in bed.  Without the ritual I had performed since childhood I did not feel my day was set.

To make a perfect cup of tea one must first be present.  Not just physically, mentally.    Each step is just as important as the final sip.   In brief for me it is as follows, fill your loved kettle with cold fresh water.  This is more important then many would know.  Then of course heat to a boil.

In my family, we have always used many different cups and mugs.  It really depends on mood and occasion.  All with their own personality and memories attached.  But even on the most simple morning, tea for one is set for the eyes as pleasingly as it is for two.

I like to use one of my antique platers, nothing too special but pleasing to me, they are the perfect size.  Other tea drinkers will agree with me when I tell you different mugs or cups brew a better tea.  The same goes for pots.  Some swear by Brown Betty others sterling silver.

 If you love tea daily, and, in copious amounts, I recommend a Brown Betty.  By the way, I have found a wonderful place to purchase Brown Betty tea pots, among other wonderful delights.www.brownbettyteapot.com

Most mornings I go the simple rout. I try to fool myself into thinking I will have one cup.   A buxom cup is placed on the plater along with a little bowl with sugar and a wee pitcher for milk.   I must insist on milk. Never cream and you may as well go to coffee if you are going to use some sort of fake creamer.

After the boiled water has wrested for at least three minutes pour into cup to steep for at least another three minutes.    If you are like me, and you like it strong then it can steep a bit longer.  Now I know other drinkers call this builders tea; and I suppose that is correct but strong women need strong tea to build their day.

All this is easily transported to my desk or kitchen table.   Once brewed I savor the first sip take a deep breath and ready my mind for the beautiful and full day ahead.

Oh, the toast!  Well to be perfect it must be toasted golden brown and buttered as soon as it is out of the toaster.  Timing is everything.

I wonder how many others in North America come from long lines of tea drinkers?